Mission

Mississippi Center for Justice is a nonprofit, public interest law firm committed to advancing racial and economic justice. Supported and staffed by attorneys and other professionals, the Center develops and pursues strategies to combat discrimination and poverty statewide.

Mississippi Center for Justice was organized to address the urgent need to re-establish in-state advocacy on behalf of low-income people and communities of color. Since its beginnings, the Center has advanced social and economic justice in Mississippi by:

  • Negotiating a $172 million settlement with Mississippi and federal officials for the reconstruction and repair of over 5,000 low-income homes damaged by Hurricane Katrina, following a lawsuit over Mississippi's diversion of housing disaster funds to expand a state-owned port
  • Protecting fair housing for hundreds of low-income residents in the Mississippi Delta by securing lower rents and better maintenance as the result of a lawsuit against the South Delta Regional Housing Authority
  • Organizing a regional pro bono response to the BP Deepwater Horizon oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico to help ensure equitable claims settlements for low-income persons
  • Preventing 65,000 poverty-level, aged and disabled Mississippians (PLADS) from losing healthcare
  • Dismantling a Jim Crow-era school board election system in the Mississippi Delta
  • Ending the torture of juveniles in the state’s training schools, successfully fighting for their right to counsel, and helping pass sweeping juvenile justice reform
  • Attacking predatory lending practices in the migrant poultry worker community and defeating legislation that would raise the rates on low-dollar loans statewide
  • Preventing the funneling of children from the schoolhouse to the jailhouse by teaching grassroots community organizers and defense attorneys to navigate the state’s convoluted juvenile justice system
  • Facilitating development of a comprehensive strategy to eliminate poverty by economic justice advocates from across the Deep South